Debates of Congress from 1789 to 1856

Debates of Congress from 1789 to 1856

Debates of Congress from 1789 to 1856

Abridgement of the Debates of Congress from 1789 to 1856 from Gales and Seaton's Annals of Congress; from Their Register of Debates; and from the Official Reported Debates. By John C. Rives - Vol XII covers the debates of the 22nd Congress, 1832-1836. New York: D. Appleton, 1860. Assumed First. There are several entries on slavery – many, many pages on the slavery issues in DC. Also anti-slavery incendiary publications, slavery in Arkansas, slavery memorials, abolition of slavery, etc.. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Full-Leather.


-- The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States; with an appendix, containing important state papers and public documents, and all the laws of a public nature; with a copious index. Volume II, comprising (with volume 1) the period from March 3, 1789, to March 3, 1791, inclusive. Compiled from authentic materials, by Joseph Gales, Senior. Washington: Gales and Seaton, 1834. Volume 2 only which covers February 18, 1790 to March 3, 1791. Also includes the 188 page appendix w/ "reports and other documents". In late 18th/ early 19th century period full leather binding.


-- Supreme Court Reports (1801 - 1882) -- a collection of 98 books of US Supreme Court Reports. They were published in 1903 by the Banks Law Publishing Company. They cover Supreme Court case law from 1801 to 1882. Imagine what has been stated about the Missouri Compromise, the Dred Scott Decision and others relating to the Black experience in America. Important tool in the hands of researchers. Very important and scarce volumes -- that's 98 volumes!


-- An extremely rare bound historical account of the Congress (468 pages), titled APPENDIX TO THE CONGRESSIONAL GLOBE, dated 1859 with the first part being the speech given by Pres. James Buchanan to the Joint Session of the Congress. Excellent historical account of the actual word for word debates that went on just prior to the outbreak of the Civil War., the slavery question, the expansion of slavery into the Territories, the Admission of Kansas to the Union is hotly debated by both slave-holding and free-state supporters. This included the debate concerning the FAMOUS BOOK BY HELPER, called at this time, THE BLACK BIBLE, this book was banned in the south. The southern Congressmen are up in arms over the content of this book depicting the south as barbarians with their slaves, etc. News of the re-election of Stephen A. Douglas, the Homestead Bill, debates over the marriage of Mormons to many wives, Details of the famous TEXAS REGIMENT, and their action against the frontier Indians. Much on slavery is debated. The DRED SCOTT DECISION (1857 US Supreme Court, 19 U.S. 393, 407, 15 L.ED. 691, decision said, "No white man was bound to respect the rights of an African".) is debated in detail. Details of ABRAHAM LINCOLN are brought forth by the Senator from Illinois and the newly established Republican Party. Each page printed in three columns for maximum information; foxed throughout. 


-- Congressional Globe 1858 debates proceeding US congress. The Congressional Globe: Containing the Debates and Proceedings of the Second Session of the Thirty-Fifth Congress: Also, of the Special Session of the Senate. by John C. Rives. Washington: John C. Rives, 1859. Mid-19th century period 1/2 leather binding. Smooth spine in five gilt-ruled compartments w/ gilt title and date. Blue marbled paper covered boards w/ leather board corners. Binding tight and sound. 1000s of pages of information on the proceedings of Congress. Index for both the US Senate and the US House of Representatives. This covers Dec. 10, 1858 through Feb. 14, 1859. Includes much on the Native Americans and the Slavery Trade bill. VG+ near fine condition, very little wear. Measures 9" x 12." 1040 pp.


-- 1862 Congressional Globe, 960 pages. Containing the debates and proceedings of the Second Session of the Thirty-seventh Congress. Edited by John C. Rives and published at the Congressional Globe Office, Washington, 1862. very slight occasional foxing, otherwise in remarkably good condition.. Includes many debates on military support, slavery, secession, and other issues relevant to the Civil War. Scarce item.


-- 1854 Congressional Report -- African Slave Trade -- Brazil. 33d Congress, 1st Session - Senate - Ex Doc. No. 47. 14 pages. Titled "Message From The President of the United States, Communicating, In compliance with a resolution of the Senate, the correspondence between Mr. Schenck, United States Minister to Brazil, and the Secretary of State, in relation to the African slave trade." 


-- Abraham Lincoln signed 25 copies of the Emancipation Proclamation. In this collection are two copies of the Emancipation Proclamation directly from one of the originals signed by Lincoln in 1863.


-- Rare Abraham Lincoln Campaign first edition book printed during Lincoln's presidential campaign of 1860. POLITICAL DEBATES BETWEEN HON. ABRAHAM LINCOLN and HON. STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS In the Celebrated Campaign of 1858, in Illinois; INCLUDING THE PRECEDING SPEECHES OF EACH, AT CHICAGO, SPRINGFIELD, ETC: ALSO, THE TWO GREAT SPEECHES OF MR. LINCOLN IN OHIO, IN 1859, AS CAREFULLY PREPARED BY THE REPORTERS OF EACH PART, AND PUBLISHED AT THE TIMES OF THEIR DELIVERY. COLUMBUS: FOLLETT, FOSTER AND COMPANY, 1860.

BACKGROUND: The Lincoln-Douglas Debates were a series of debates that took place during the 1858 presidential campaign in seven locations across Illinois. Even though Douglas won the election, these debates had launched Lincoln into the national spotlight. These debates are considered a major contributor to the separating of the South from the Union and ultimately leading to the Civil War.


-- "The Emancipation", January 24, 1863 Harper's Weekly. Famous double page engraving by Thomas Nast, the subject of which is Emancipation. Measures 22" x 15 1/2". Condition is very good.


-- 1860 Congressional Report Civil War, 835 pages. A lot of discussion about slavery-related issues.


-- Rare Senate report (March 8, 1860) stating that 7 families are asking for compensation for slaves taken and carried away by the British during the War of 1812.

-- House of Representative Resolution (February 26, 1866) about the "Protection of Emancipated Slaves and Freedmen."

 


-- Front Cover Portraits of Dred Scott, His Wife, Harriet and Children Eliza & Lizzie!. Multi-Column Details of His Life, Family and The Decision of The Supreme Court! An Original and Complete Issue of LESLIE'S WEEKLY dated June 27, 1857. Fine Illustrations with Reports Including: A Front Cover Series of Portraits with Indepth Report: "VISIT TO DRED SCOTT---HIS FAMILY--INCIDENTS OF HIS LIFE---DECISION OF THE SUPREME COURT---ELIZA AND LIZZIE, CHILDREN OF DRED SCOTT, HIS WIFE, HARRIET" Fine Descriptive Report!

-- The Eastern Argus, a very rare historical newspaper, printed in Portland, Maine on September 12, 1858 announcing: "The Death of Dred Scott."


BACKGROUND: Dred Scott (1799 - Sept. 17, 1858), was a slave in the USA who sued unsuccessfully for his freedom in the famous Dred Scott v. Sanford case of 1857. His case was based on the fact that he and his wife Harriet were slaves, but had lived in states and territories where slavery was illegal, including Illinois and Minnesota (which was then part of the Wisconsin Territory). The United States Supreme Court ruled seven to two against Scott, finding that neither he, nor any person of African ancestry, could claim citizenship in the United States, and that therefore Scott could not bring suit in federal court under diversity of citizenship rules. Moreover, Scott's temporary residence outside Missouri did not effect his emancipation under the Missouri Compromise, since reaching that result would deprive Scott's owner of his property.

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